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“Mutant”, by Michael Montoure

December 21, 2015 Leave a comment

“Mutant” is a story about a familiar figure from song and story, told very differently.

[Updates, two:  I forgot to mention that I know Michael Montoure personally, although this story was a complete surprise to me when I found it, and that the web page I link to below has broken headers, as of 12/21/15.  The story is present on the page and perfectly readable.]

Non-Spoiler Summary

Ever wonder if Rudolph actually liked saving the day, that Christmas?  He didn’t.  Oh, how he didn’t.

Why should you read it?

Because in about a page, Montoure can make you look at a story you’ve known your whole life a new way, teach you some things about inclusion and exclusion, and make you fear for next Christmas.

Where to find “Mutant”

This story is available freely on Montoure’s website, Bloodletters.  Find it here.

_Feed_, by Mira Grant

Feed is a 2010 science fiction/horror novel by Mira Grant, a pen name of Seanan McGuire.  It was nominated for the Hugo for Best Novel of 2011.

Non-Spoiler Summary

Feed is the first book of the Newsflesh trilogy, the story of a group of bloggers who are the first citizen journalists to accompany a major party presidential candidate on his campaign travels.  So it’s a political story.  But the main campaign issues are all effects of the Kellis-Amberlee virus, which has caused a condition of post-death animation.  Zombies.  So it’s a horror story.  And someone’s trying to interfere with the political campaign.  So it’s a thriller.  And it succeeds brilliantly at all of these.

Why should you read it?

Zombies aren’t what this book is about.  It’s about people.  Real people.  Georgia Mason and her brother Shaun are the leaders of the first news blog that is invited to accompany a senator on his presidential campaign.  The zombies are there to put pressure on people.  To cast America and the world in a new light.  And to allow Grant/McGuire to talk about fear and what it does to people.

This book is brilliant.  The author is merciless with her characters, like you must if you’re writing about a world with such danger in it.  There is risk and it is real and people suffer.  I just finished rereading Feed for the fourth time, and it made me cry in public again.  Three times.

Georgia and Shaun love each other very much, and have a trust that is palpable.  These characters are more vivid as a team than they are individually, which is saying a lot considering that I feel like I could have a conversation with either one of them.  The rest of their team of bloggers are also drawn beautifully; several of the characters have such distinctive voices that it’s easy to tell who’s speaking just from the dialog.  The culture of bloggers is also fascinating; they’ve subdivided the news into factual, action, and creative, and call themselves Newsies, Irwins, or Fictionals.

The book is horror, but it’s not the zombies that will scare you.  It’s the deformation of our culture that they have caused, and we have allowed.  Privacy is gone, just gone.  Fear is endemic, and people don’t fight it.  They’ve just given up.  Entire states have been yielded to the dead, and this is a divisive issue between the parties.

It’s appalling.  And understandable.  How would you feel if your elderly father with the weak heart was going to get up after he died and try to eat you?  Someone else’s elderly father?  Strangers on the street?  Every living person is a time bomb, and sometimes they don’t even have to die first for the virus to take over.

Fear.  Horror at ourselves for feeling the fear, and for living with it, and changing to accomodate.  And terror about what it means for humanity.

Feed is not an easy book, and it is not for children, in any way.  When asked recently, I hesitated before recommending it for a fifteen-year-old I didn’t know.  It is, however, a book I have never forgotten from the moment I started it.

Although I recommend the entire trilogy whole-heartedly, I am  not going to review books 2 and 3, Deadline and Blackout, because there is absolutely no way to do so without spoiling Feed.  Just trust me when I say that the series only gets better from this book, which I’m already recommending very highly.

Where to find Feed

Feed is available in print or in all major digital forms.  It is not freely available. 

“Counting From Ten”, by Michael Montoure

August 9, 2010 Leave a comment

NOT SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN.  This story is physical horror.

DISCLAIMER: The author is a good friend of mine. The story was written because of a conversation we had, and is about a personal phobia of mine. However, Michael has had no input into the choice of this story or the text of this recommendation.

“Counting From Ten”, which is also the title of Montoure’s debut short story collection, is a story about a man under a curse, and a friend who tries to help him get free of that curse.

Horror is so often about death or the fear of death. Slasher movies, ghosts, enough blood coming from the walls or the ceiling that someone surely had to die, terror of something that wants to kill you/eat you/destroy you. But what if that wasn’t what we were being asked to be afraid of?

What if it was just the loss of a … finger?  And what if that was mercy?

The joy of Montoure’s writing is that he makes some of the most horrific decisions that characters in this story make perfect sense, like there’s nothing else that they could possibly do. Like this abomination of a decision is the kindest possible thing that could happen. And only then, after you accept that, does the hammer to the your sensibilities hit.

AVAILABLE: audio; in the collection Counting from Ten

Michael Montoure’s website
The text of “Counting From Ten” is not currently available on the web.
Audio of “Counting From Ten”

Buy Counting From Ten from Stone Pine Press