“Kin”, by Bruce McAllister

“Kin” is a 2006 science fiction short story by Bruce McAllister.  It was nominated for the Hugo for Best Short Story of 2007.

Non-Spoiler Summary

“Kin” is the story of a young boy whose mother is pregnant, but the Bureau of Population Control has decreed that his unborn sister is to be terminated.  The boy doesn’t want this to happen. . . so he tries to hire an alien assassin to kill the man who made the decision.  But he doesn’t have enough money for the fee.

Why should you read it?

I will now invoke Campbell… halfway.  The Antalou assassin is very much an alien that thinks like a person, but instead of coming from our culture, he comes from a completely different one.  And instead of coming from our biology, he comes from one that has equipped him to be able to take the door off of a personal helicopter with his talons.

And he’s faced with a boy he feels sympathy for, but who doesn’t have enough money to pay for his services.  The services he wants to render.  So he gets creative.  But not lethal.

I like this story enough that I had read it early in the Hugo Project, in McAllister’s collection, The Girl Who Loved Animals, but chose to listen to it, as well, to hear Steve Eley’s narration and experience the story again before writing this review.  This one is simple and clear, but very enjoyable.

Where to find “Kin”

E scape Pod has a wonderful audio version.

“Down Memory Lane”, by Mike Resnick

June 26, 2013 2 comments

“Down Memory Lane” is a 2005 science fiction short story by Mike Resnick.  It was nominated for the Hugo for Best Short Story of 2006.

Non-Spoiler Summary

“Down Memory Lane” is the story of a man losing his wife to Alzheimer’s, and the lengths to which he’s willing to go to help her.

Why should you read it?

For the first time in this blog, I’m going to tell you that I’m not the person to tell you why you should read this story.  It’s well written, as every Resnick piece is.  However, as someone who lost his father to Huntington’s Disease and is dealing with my mother losing parts of her memory at this very moment, I almost never enjoy stories about mental degeneration.  And this blog is about telling you what I love.

I don’t love this story.  It’s very well done, but it was no fun at all for me.  If you want to a recommendation, let the bulk of Resnick’s work make it, and perhaps read some or all of the other pieces of his I’m going to recommend here, or have.  But I can’t recommend this one, even though it may deserve it.  I just can’t do it.

Where to find “Down Memory Lane”

E scape Pod has a well acted version of “Down Memory Lane” in audio.

“Travels with My Cats”, by Mike Resnick

“Travels with My Cats” is a 2004 fantasy short story by Mike Resnick.  It won the Hugo for Best Short Story of 2005.

Non-Spoiler Summary

“Travels with My Cats” is the story of a man living a bit of a wasted life; he started with dreams, but they slowly grew further and further out of his reach.  When he rediscovers a travel book he purchased and enjoyed as a child, the long-dead author and her cats appear.  She reignites his passion for life.

Why should you read it?

There’s a bit of a problem here.  Mike Resnick is going to show up a lot on this list, because he’s been nominated for an award every year for the last six hundred year.  Perhaps a bit of an exaggeration, but not by much: he’s the most nominated author ever.

This story starts with a very disillusioning life.  It then moves on to a very enchanting relationship, and ends with a man changed.  The story is very effective and very enjoyable.  It’s far from science fiction or high fantasy–the Wikipedia article calls this magic realism, and I’d have to agree.  Beautifully written, and an emotional journey.  Not all of it is a fun journey, but a real one.

Where to find “Travels with My Cats”

Asimov’s has a copy of the text online.  Escape Pod has also done a lovely audio version.


“Tk’tk’tk”, by David D. Levine

June 24, 2013 1 comment

“Tk’tk’tk” is a 2005 science fiction short story by David D. Levine.  It won the Hugo for Best Short Story of 2006.

Non-Spoiler Summary

“Tk’tk’tk” is the story of a human salesman who goes to a very alien planet, and tries to sell the software he represents to other humans.  Unfortunately, the people he’s speaking to are aliens, and don’t buy.  When he learns to sell to aliens, then suddenly success comes to him.  When he learns to be an alien, then his life changes.

Why should you read it?

On one level, this is brilliant science fiction, with a very Campbellian hook: these aliens don’t think much like humans, but they do think as well as humans.  But this time, I’m not going to suggest you should read this story for the science fiction.  “Tk’tk’tk” is the story of a man who is learning when struggle is not just going to get you nothing, but is actively counterproductive.  It’s the story of a man learning to release himself and become the other, in order to serve both the other and himself.  That’s the part of it I’ll be taking with me.  The aliens themselves are almost set dressing for the transformation of a man with an drive to overcome into a man who accepts.

Where to find “Tk’tk’tk”

This story is available online as text courtesy of Asimov’s, or in audio from Escape Pod.  I especially recommend the text version, as the alien language makes for some sounds you’ve never heard before.  I admire them for even trying this story.

“A Study In Emerald”, by Neil Gaiman

“A Study In Emerald” is a 2003 science fiction short story by Neil Gaiman.  It won the Hugo for Best Short Story of 2004.

Non-Spoiler Summary

“A Study In Emerald” is the story of a murder investigation, conducted by a consulting detective who lives on Baker Street.  The murder victim is the nephew of the Queen of England.  And not human at all.  He’s an Old One, as is the Queen.

Why should you read it?

As one expects from Gaiman, the writing is brilliant.  The characters are layered, the dialog is crisp and appropriate to the time, and the style is both modern and matching the writing of the time.  The world-building is solid, although unlikely, as the Old Ones have replaced the crowned heads of Europe in this alternate world, where England is Albion, instead.  The powers of the consulting detective are, as they should be, amazing until explained, and then obvious–a trick many pastiches of Holmes do not carry off.  I would rate this as my favorite Holmes-derived work, and also my favorite spin of the Cthulhu mythos.

Where to find “A Study In Emerald”

This story is available online, courtesy of Neil Gaiman himself.  Normally, I’m not a fan of fiction in PDF’s, as it makes it hard to get on my Kindle, but this one comes with lovely layout and little dropped-in ads for dark Victorian products, such as medical exsanguination by V. Tepes.  Well worth printing out and reading in this form for the bonuses alone.

“Kirinyaga”, by Mike Resnick

“Kirinyaga” is a 1988 science fiction short story by Mike Resnick.  It won the Hugo for Best Short Story of 1989.

Non-Spoiler Summary

“Kirinyaga” is the story of the mundumugu, or witch doctor, of a recreated Kikuyu people, living on a created world in space.  They’ve followed their tribal ways, and killed a baby born feet first, which is an indication that the baby is a demon.  Now they face an intervention by Maintenance, the people who made the created world they live on, and unspecified penalties.

Why should you read it?

Killing a baby is a bad thing.  Killing a demon is a good thing.  How does one tell if a baby is a demon?  Well, Maintenance knows that if both parents are human, there’s a good chance the baby is.  The mundumugu knows differently–his culture tells him that the circumstances of the baby’s birth clearly indicate that it is not human.

He wants cultural purity for his people, the adults of which have chosen to live by the (sometimes harsh) rules of the Kikuyu.  But babies… haven’t.  How can he convince Maintenance to leave them alone to follow their traditional ways?

The writing is lovely.  The Eutopian worlds are a brilliant idea that I continue to want to read more about.  This is one of my favorite stories, and I was delighted to reread it for this review.  (Note that this is the same world as “One Perfect Morning, With Jackals“.)

Where to find “Kirinyaga”

Baen Books has graciously allowed us to read “Kirinyaga” online.  

“Maneki Neko”, by Bruce Sterling

“Maneki Neko” is a 1998 science fiction short story by Bruce Sterling.  It was nominated for the Hugo for Best Short Story of 1999.

Non-Spoiler Summary

“Maneki Neko” is the story of a man who does what his phone tells him to do, the trouble he gets in, and how it gets him out.  Because his phone is connecting him to a series of other people who are all trying to do small acts for each other, to help each other out.  With computer co-ordination.

Why should you read it?

The Internet is supposedly built to route information around damage, so that the information arrives regardless of the existence of a particular node or link.  “Maneki Neko” is the story of a network of computers and humans, using themselves to route luck, good fortune, and kindness around damage to that network.  In this case, the damage comes from a law enforcement official, who doesn’t believe that people would help each other, and assumes there must be something criminal going on.

The story is thought-provoking, funny, and a little bit slapstick.  All in all, a very good quick read.

Where to find “Maneki Neko”.

This story is available at Lightspeed.